The Honest, Ugly Truth About Fluoride


Fluoride is an endocrine-disrupting, neurotoxic, and bone-weakening substance that the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) defines as a drug when used to prevent disease, because unlike the minerals we need (e.g. calcium), humans have no known physiological requirement for fluoride.

Sodium fluoride, long known as an effective roach poison, is added to tablets and drops (i.e., “fluoride supplements”) for the purpose of preventing tooth decay.

But because of fluoride’s toxicity, you cannot purchase fluoride “supplements” over-the-counter; they can only be dispensed by prescription under the supervision of a doctor. In short, sodium fluoride is not a nutritional “supplement;” it is a prescription drug, and a dangerous one.

Although fluoride drugs have been prescribed for over 50 years, the FDA recently announced that marketing fluoride drops and tablets for cavity prevention violates federal law, because FDA has never approved these products as either safe or effective.

FDA made this stunning declaration in a Warning Letter, in which the Agency called on a manufacturer to immediately cease selling fluoride drops and tablets. Removing harmful fluoride drugs from the market will protect the health of millions of children, but we also need to address the big elephant in the room: water fluoridation.

Fluoride Facts You Need To Know

  • Fluoride is a toxic industrial waste product, which may also be contaminated with lead, arsenic, radionucleotides, aluminum and other industrial contaminants. The fluoride added to municipal water supplies is not pharmaceutical grade.
  • Twenty-three studies from four countries indicate that even moderate exposure to fluoride lowers IQ.
  • The daily dose of fluoride recommended by the American Dental Association results in the same level of fluoride in your blood shown to cause an 8-point drop in IQ.
  • Poison control should be called if you swallow a quarter milligram of fluoride from toothpaste. Meanwhile just ONE glass of water can contain this amount of fluoride.
  • To remain within “safe” limits, you’d have to use such a small amount of fluoridated toothpaste that one tube would last you several years.